Bond Glossary

by GoldenPi
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The bond market is full of complex concepts, terminology, and acronyms. “Bond Glossary” is a one-stop resource for finding the meaning of terminologies and phrases any investor may encounter in the Bond Market.

A

ADDITIONAL TIER I BONDS (AT1 BONDS)

Tier I Bonds also called Perpetual Bonds. As per BASEL III norms, theoretically, these bonds can be carried on till infinity. In reality, they come with a call option after 5 years or 10 years from the date of issuance. It is a popular option among Banks to raise capital to meet their core capital (Tier1 capital) needs as instructed by RBI.

This category carries considerable risk and hence pays high-interest rates to investors. The issuer can skip interest payments if current year business is in the loss. In dire conditions, it can get converted to equity (with approval from RBI). Hence they are also called “quasi-equity”. If RBI approves it can be written off up to the full value as well (with approval from RBI).

Note: In case of winding up of the issuer, if any payment is to be made to Tier I capital holders, AT I bondholders are paid before equity holders. However, in case the Bank is getting merged with another Bank due to its non-viable business state, then AT1 Bonds can be written off fully while keeping the equity capital unaffected.

 

ACCRUED INTEREST

This is the interest earned by an investor for a given period of time,

The bond issuer pays the bond holder a fixed interest on a predetermined schedule. However, if a bond were sold between its interest payment dates, the purchaser would have to pay the market price of the bond plus the appropriate fraction of the accrued coupon interest earned but not yet received by the party selling the bond.

Example: A has a 1 unit of a Bond with face value of Rs 1 Lac and a coupon rate of 10% (payable annually). Every year A receives Rs 10 K from the issuer on a specific date. Then, after 6 months from one such payment, A sells this Bond to B. B then has to pay Rs 5K as accrued interest to A along with the principal value of the Bond to A.

B

BRICKWORK RATINGS

Brickwork Ratings is a SEBI registered credit rating agency that has also been accredited by RBI and impaneled by NSIC. Brickworks has rated issues of a large number of banks including SBI, Bank of Baroda, Bank of India, Canada Bank, Corporation Bank, Punjab National Bank, Andhra Bank, and many others.

BOND MARKET

The bond market is a financial market where debt securities are issued and traded. The issuers sell bonds or other debt instruments in the bond market to fund the operations of their organizations.

BONDS

A debt security issued by entities such as corporations, governments or their agencies (eg. statutory authorities). A bondholder is a creditor of the issuer and not a shareholder.

C

COUPON PAYMENT

A coupon payment is an annual interest that is paid to the bondholder from the date the bond is issued until the maturity date.

CONSIDERATION AMOUNT

The loan amount or principal paid by the bond investor is a consideration, in exchange for the borrower or bond issuing company’s promise to repay the principal and interest as per the agreed clauses.

COUPON RATE

The coupon rate is the rate of interest paid by fixed-interest security. It is the annual payment towards the face value of a bond made by the bond issuing company to the bond investor.

CONVERTIBLE BONDS

A convertible bond (or a convertible debenture if it has a maturity of greater than 10 years) is a type of bond that the holder can convert into a specified number of shares of common stock in the issuing company or cash of equal value at a predetermined time in future.

CREDIT RATING

A credit rating is an evaluation of the credit risk of a prospective debtor, predicting their ability to pay back the debt, and an implicit forecast of the likelihood of the debtor defaulting.

CURRENT YIELD

The current yield is the present interest rate that the bond is offering to its owner. This is the rate of interest that a potential buyer can expect if they acquire this bond and hold on to it for a year.

Current Yield = Annual interest payment/ Current bond price.

CORPORATE BONDS

A security issued by a company in which the company acknowledges that a stated sum is owed and will be repaid at a certain date. A corporate bond, like a government-issued bond, usually pays a stipulated amount of interest throughout its life to the holder.

F

FIXED INTEREST RATE

A fixed interest rate is an unchanging rate paid on bonds. It remains the same for a predefined period of time (it can apply for the part of the term or entire term).

G

GOVERNMENT BONDS

A government bond or sovereign bond is a bond issued by a national government, generally with a promise to pay periodic interest payments and to repay the face value on the maturity date.

M

MUNICIPAL BOND

A municipal bond is a debt security issued by a state, municipality or county to finance its capital expenditures, including the construction of highways, bridges or schools.

P

PRIMARY MARKET

The Capital market where companies or governments directly issue securities (debt-based or equity-based) to raise funds is called Primary Market. In the primary market, the issuer sells securities at predetermined prices. The buyers in the market can be financial institutions, corporates, mutual funds, and individuals.

Consider this market as the place where the security is being sold for the first time to buyers.

S

SECONDARY MARKET

The secondary market is the capital market where securities are traded among investors. Trading can happen between  Financial institutions, individual investors, or both. The issuer doesn’t participate in trading. The price of the securities in the Secondary Market is dependant on current demand and supply. 


The advantage of the Secondary market is, it facilitates trade between investors and makes securities available to investors who could not participate in the Primary Market. The secondary market plays a vital part of ensuring liquidity. This away helps the issuing entity to raise capital in the future as investors are assured of liquidity/ exit option when needed. 

 

T

TIER II BONDS

As per BASEL III norms, Banks raise money via Tier II bonds to meet regulatory norms around capital adequacy. Tier II bonds are subordinated debt and hence not first to be paid during the liquidation process. Tier II bonds are senior to Tier I Bonds.

Note: When a bank has to write off losses, it will first write off Tier I bonds and then, if required, move on to Tier II bonds. It also can be written off if PONV (point of non-viability) is triggered.

TIER I BONDS (ADDITIONAL TIER I BONDS)

Tier I Bonds also called Perpetual Bonds. As per BASEL III norms, theoretically, these bonds can be carried on till infinity. In reality, they come with a call option after 5 years or 10 years from the date of issuance. It is a popular option among Banks to raise capital to meet their core capital (Tier I capital) needs as instructed by RBI.

They carry considerable risk and hence pay high-interest rates to investors. The issuer can skip interest payments if current year business is in the loss. In dire conditions, it can get converted to equity (with approval from RBI). Hence they are also called “quasi-equity”. If RBI approves, then it can be written off up to the full value as well

Note: In case of winding up of the issuer, if any payment is to be made to Tier I capital holders, ATI bondholders are paid before equity holders. . However, in case the Bank is getting merged with another Bank due to its non-viable business state, then AT1 Bonds can be written off fully while keeping the equity capital unaffected.

Y

YIELD TO CALL

Some bonds have a call option where the bond issuer can redeem the bond before the maturity date. The issuer needs a call option to reduce interest rate risk and avoid damage when interest rates decline. Having a call option will allow the issuer to redeem bonds and reissue them at a lower interest rate. However, there are some preset terms and conditions that have to be met. The calculation of yield to call depends on the coupon rate, the call date and the price at which the bond was purchased by the holder.

YIELD TO MATURITY (YTM)

The yield to maturity is the total return expected from a bond if it is held to maturity. In other words, it is the internal rate of return (IRR) of a bond if the investor holds the bond until maturity, and if all payments are made as per schedule.

 

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